Sustainability

What is driving the need for more sustainable practices?

Structural steel tubular (pipe) users, like the construction industry amongst others, are under growing pressure to be more resource efficient, to lower embodied carbon, and strive for a Circular Economy. Alternative materials and material reuse strategies are critical to meet these new targets. Understanding and documenting the results for environmental impact reduction of surplus steel tubulars, like those supplied by John Lawrie Tubulars, is an opportunity to support the move to lower carbon footprint projects and a Circular Economy.

We’ve been repurposing surplus steel tubulars for the last 30 years. Reusing this material for structural applications like piling creates a circular economy whereby existing products are kept in use for longer, helping to protect the earth’s natural resources. Pipe purchased from these sources exceeds UK piling specifications providing a robust solution for your project.

What is John Lawrie Tubulars doing about Sustainability?

John Lawrie Tubulars repurposes surplus steel pipe from around the globe. This saves CO2 emissions that would be generated by the returning of the surplus pipe to steel mills for re-melting, a process that includes transportation, handling, and cutting to re-enter the melt stream.

Following the completion of a life cycle assessment in 2020, we can now show that for every ton of John Lawrie Tubulars repurposed steel pipe, there is a CO2 saving of over 97.21% when compared to the production of new prime steel. This goes a long way to supporting net zero and sustainability goals for both our clients and our suppliers.

John Lawrie Tubulars Life Cycle Analysis (LCA)

Rather than rely on data simply pulled from the Internet, John Lawrie Tubulars has undertaken a UK-specific Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) on its steel tubulars management and operating processes, completed in 2020. The LCA was performed by Giraffe Innovation Ltd., an award-winning environmental and technical consultancy in the UK.

The CO2 emissions calculated in the UK LCA includes full life cycle use of the steel tubulars including any incoming transportation, handling and manufacturing, outgoing transportation, and installation of the tubulars (for top driven piles). The John Lawrie Tubulars CO2 emissions were then compared to steel industry emissions for new mill pipe using the same “ship to” locations as the John Lawrie Tubulars analysis.

What does this mean?

What is the CO2 savings by using repurposed pipe from John Lawrie Tubulars instead of buying and using brand new pipe from the mill and its distributors? Here is what the LCA tells us:

  • John Lawrie Tubulars save 2163.95kgCO2e per tonne of steel product, which is 97.21% of the carbon emissions of a prime steel equivalent (cradle to gate).

JLT can provide a customized CO2 Savings Certificate to preferred suppliers and valued customers on a job basis, monthly basis or annually.

C02 Certificate

Surplus Steel Tubulars.
100% of the Quality < 3% of the CO2 impact of new steel.

The results of our Life Cycle Analysis of the repurposing of surplus steel piping, by John Lawrie Tubulars shows that 1 ton of repurposed tubular steel pipe has a carbon footprint of 62.05kgCO2e per ton (cradle to gate).

By comparison, the new mill pipe procured through distributors has a carbon footprint of 2,226kgCO2e per ton (cradle to gate).

This means that the John Lawrie tubular products save 2163.95kgCO2e per ton, which is 97.21% of the carbon emissions. In other words, the material carbon footprint of repurposed tubular products has less than 3% of the impact of those made from prime steel.

Our Roadmap to a Circular Economy

What is a circular economy?

We know we can’t continue to live like this, however. We can’t keep throwing waste into landfill, we must look for opportunities to either keep the material and products in use for longer, or create these products from materials that have prolonged shelf lives. A circular economy is a continuous cycle of processes that sees material “stay in use for as long as possible, extract the maximum value from them whilst in use, then recover and regenerate products and materials at the end of each service life.”*

Why do we want a circular economy?

A circular economy will reduce waste, improve productivity, reduce environmental impacts and increase opportunities for growth and diversification, as well as focus on society-wide benefits. The aim of a circular economy is to design out waste and pollution and regenerate natural systems.

What is a circular economy?

We know we can’t continue to live like this, however. We can’t keep throwing waste into landfill, we must look for opportunities to either keep the material and products in use for longer, or create these products from materials that have prolonged shelf lives. A circular economy is a continuous cycle of processes that sees material “stay in use for as long as possible, extract the maximum value from them whilst in use, then recover and regenerate products and materials at the end of each service life.”*

Why do we want a circular economy?

A circular economy will reduce waste, improve productivity, reduce environmental impacts and increase opportunities for growth and diversification, as well as focus on society-wide benefits. The aim of a circular economy is to design out waste and pollution and regenerate natural systems.